Oprah Winfrey

Oprah’s Tearful Speech at Power of Women
  • Description

    Oprah Winfrey, recognized for her charity work with the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy Foundation, was the only one to receive a standing ovation at Variety’s Power of Women luncheon presented by Lifetime.

     

Dr. Zoubida Charrouf

Valorization of Argan in Morocco
  • Description

    Interview with Professor Zoubida Charrouf from Morocco about the social impact of promoting Argan products on the local population.

Malala Yousafzai

The Story of Malala Yousafzai
  • Description

    Fionnuala Sweeney profiles Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani girl and champion for girls' education, shot by the Taliban.

Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai - The right to learning should be given to any child
  • Description

    Nobel Peace Prize winner of 2014, Malala Yousafzai, gives an incredible inspiring and humble speech to the world.

     

Danielle Bicknell

How can gender equality make impact on communities?
WikiStage ESCP Europe 7
  • Description

    Danielle Bicknell is Assistant Programme Specialist at The Division for Gender Equality at UNESCO - ‎UNESCO.

    www.wikistage.org

WikiStage

Malala Yousafzai
  • Description

    Malala Yousafzai, the youngest ever Nobel prize winner. Only a girl, but yet synonym for the resistance to the terrorism and a loud spokesperson for the girl education.

    www.wikistage.org

Malala Yousafzai

The Daily Show - Malala Yousafzai Extended Interview
  • Description

    In this exclusive, unedited interview, "I Am Malala" author Malala Yousafzai remembers the Taliban's rise to power in her Pakistani hometown. She describes the beauty of her homeland and the cruelty of the Taliban. Malala Yousafzai also offers suggestions for Americans looking to help out overseas and stresses the importance of education.
     

Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai Nobel Peace Prize Speech
  • Description

    "My great hope is that this will be the last time we must fight for the education of our children. Let us solve this once and for all."
    Join her movement to see #TheLast at http://malala.org

    Malala Yousafzai, 17, is the first Pakistani, and youngest ever recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Malala Yousafzai

Emma Watson interviews Malala Yousafzai Nobel Peace Prize
  • Description

    "Today I met Malala. She was giving, utterly graceful, compelling and intelligent. That might sound obvious but I was struck by this even more in person. There are lots of NGOs out there in the world doing great things... But if there were one I would put my money on to succeed and make change on this planet, it would be hers. (The Malala Fund). Malala isn't messing around or mincing her words (one of the many reasons I love her). She has the strength of her convictions coupled with the kind of determination I rarely encounter... And it doesn't seem to have been diminished by the success she has already had. And lastly…She has a sense of zen/calm/peace (please insert your word here) around her. I leave this for last because it is perhaps the most important. Maybe as a result of what she has been through? I personally think it is just who she is…

    Perhaps the most moving moment of today for me was when Malala addressed the issue of feminism. To give you some background, I had initially planned to ask Malala whether or not she was a feminist but then researched to see whether she had used this word to describe herself. Having seen that she hadn't, I decided to take the question out before the day of our interview. To my utter shock Malala put the question back into one of her own answers and identified herself. Maybe feminist isn't the easiest word to use... But she did it ANYWAY. You can probably see in the interview how I felt about this. She also gave me time at the end of the Q&A to speak about some of my own work, which she most certainly didn't need to do, I was there to interview her. I think this gesture is so emblematic of what Malala and I went on to discuss. I've spoken before on what a controversial word feminism is currently. More recently, I am learning what a factionalized movement it is too. We are all moving towards the same goal. Let's not make it scary to say you're a feminist. I want to make it a welcoming and inclusive movement. Let's join our hands and move together so we can make real change. Malala and I are pretty serious about it but we need you.


     

The new cyberwave of women's empowerment?
WikiStage Empow'Her
  • Description

    "That call from a mobile phone in the middle of a cemetery was really the beginning of my digital awakening. And it helped inspiring me to found W4 in 2012 (...). W4 stands for Women's WWW and we're Europe's first crowdfunding platform dedicated to girls' and women's empowerment in the world."

    "From the Philippines to Pakistan, from Cameroun to Cambodia, the world is being made better by the impact of two powerful growing trends and they're arguably two of the most important trends in the 21st century: digital technologies and women's empowerment. Together they lie at the heart of our work at W4."

    "Here we are in the 21st century and yet women and girls still bear the greater burden of poverty and suffer widespread abuses of their rights. Incredibly and unacceptably violence against girls and women remains a global pandemic, the most widespread human's rights violation"

    "The good news is that a global women's empowerment movement has been gaining a momentum. The world is waking up. Consistently, from the micro to the macro level, it has been proven that when we educate girls, when we protect girls' and women's human rights, when we promote gender equality, we drive socio-economic progress."

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